Books

CHICAGO MAGIC: A HISTORY OF ST

CHICAGO MAGIC: A HISTORY OF ST

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By the end of America's Golden Age of Magic," Chicago had taken center stage in front of an American audience drawn to the craft by the likes of Harry Houdini and Howard Thurston. Cashing in on a craze that rivaled big-band mania, magic shops and clubs sp
Chicago Modernism & The Ludlow Typograph

Chicago Modernism & The Ludlow Typograph

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This is the first book to provide a narrative account of type design in Chicago during the years 1925-50, when American typographers and graphic artists confronted the arrival of European modernism. Robert Hunter Middleton and Douglas McMurtrie were prominent in the period and spoke for Chicago in the national debates. Neither man was a Chicago native yet both worked for the Ludlow Typograph Co., a manufacturer of type setting machinery. As Paul Gehl examines their years of working side by side, it becomes clear that differing experiences of the city and its design world created two different modernisms that can be traced in the beautiful types on which they collaborated, Middleton as artist and McMurtrie as promotional man extraordinary. Gehl shows how the new typography championed loudly by McMurtrie and practised quietly by Middleton took root in Chicago a decade before the arrival of the New Bauhaus, usually described as the singular turning point in Chicago design history. The Bauhaus Boys , as Chicagoans called them, introduced new ideas, but the seeds of their success were sown in the work of Ludlow's two modernist pioneers.

The narrative is illustrated with more than fifty images, the most extensive documentation of Ludlow's specimens and promotional material ever to appear in one volume, some of it never before reproduced. Foreword by Robert McCamant.

Chicago Poems

Chicago Poems

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Chicago Poems (1916) was Carl Sandburg's first-published book of verse. Written in the poet's unique, personal idiom, these poems embody a soulfulness, lyric grace, and a love of and compassion for the common man that earned Sandburg a reputation as a poet of the people.
Among the dozens of poems in this collection are such well-known verses as Chicago, Fog, To a Contemporary Bunkshooter, Who Am I? and Under the Harvest Moon, as well as numerous others on themes of war, immigrant life, death, love, loneliness, and the beauty of nature. These early poems reveal the simplicity of style, honesty, and vision that characterized all of Sandburg's work and earned him enormous popularity in the 1920s and '30s and a Pulitzer prize in poetry in 1951.

Chicago Then and Now

Chicago Then and Now

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Chicago is a city that through history has triumphed over nature and disaster. It has bounced back from a calamitous fire, re-engineered the flow of the Chicago River and challenged gravity with a series of pioneering skyscrapers. Chicago Then and Now pairs archival photos with modern views to tell the story of the city's rich history. It is a story of determination and pride, and the evocative photos on these pages reflect the many faces of Chicago's heritage. Sites include: Grant Park, Lincoln Park, Wabash Avenue, Lake Street, Marshall Field's, State Street, Palmer House, Reliance Building, the Chicago, Majestic and Biograph Theatres, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Cultural Center, South Michigan Avenue, North Michigan Avenue, Board of Trade Building, The Rookery, Old Colony Building, Dearborn Street Station, Chicago and North Western Terminal, Illinois Central Railyards, State Street Bridge, Michigan Avenue Bridge (cover image), Wacker Drive, Chicago River from the Wrigley Building, Water Tower, Lake Shore Drive, Navy Pier, Oak Street Beach, Merchandise Mart, Wrigley Field, Comiskey Park, the Union Stockyards, and much more.
Chicago TV Horror Movie Shows: From Shock Theatre to Svengoolie

Chicago TV Horror Movie Shows: From Shock Theatre to Svengoolie

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Although the motion picture industry initially disparaged and feared television, by the late 1950s, studios saw the medium as a convenient dumping ground for thousands of films that had long been gathering dust in their vaults. As these films found their way to local TV stations, enterprising distributors grouped the titles by genre so programmers could showcase them accordingly. It was in this spirit that Chicago's tradition of TV horror movie shows was born. Chicago TV Horror Movie Shows is the first comprehensive look at Chicago's horror movie programs, from their inception in 1957 to the present.
Chicago Under Wraps

Chicago Under Wraps

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Consists of 52 essays by 51 authors, each describing a single book from an institutional or private collection.

A catalogue published to coincide with an exhibition on the same topic at the Ryerson and Burnham Libraries at The Art Institute of Chicago. The comprehensive text, written by Victor Margolin, is illustrated with color images of the dust jackets themselves. Contains a list for further reading and a checklist that reflects the exhibition.

Chicago's 50 Years of Powwows

Chicago's 50 Years of Powwows

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Since 1953, the American Indian Center of Chicago has hosted an annual powwow. The powwow is the centerpiece of contemporary Indian culture. It is how Native Americans celebrate traditional values and share their culture with a wider audience. The powwow is a place to make and rekindle friendships. It offers an opportunity to reaffirm traditional values and a chance to reconnect with family, friends, and the greater community. It is a celebration of artistic and cultural traditions, and a way of transmitting those traditions to a younger generation. Through an extensive collection of representative images, Chicago s 50 Years of Powwows chronicles the exciting history and traditions of the powwow."
CHICAGO: A BIOGRAPHY

CHICAGO: A BIOGRAPHY

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Chicago has been called by many names. Nelson Algren declared it a "City on the Make." Carl Sandburg dubbed it the "City of Big Shoulders." Upton Sinclair christened it "The Jungle," while New Yorkers, naturally, pronounced it "the Second City."

At last there is a book for all of us, whatever we choose to call Chicago. In this magisterial biography, historian Dominic Pacygatraces the storied past of his hometown, from the explorations of Joliet and Marquette in 1673 to the new wave of urban pioneers today. The city's great industrialists, reformers, and politicians--and, indeed, the many not-so-great and downright notorious--animate this book, from Al Capone and Jane Addams to Mayor Richard J. Daley and President Barack Obama. But what distinguishes this book from the many others on the subject is its author's uncommon ability to illuminate the lives of Chicago's ordinary people. Raised on the city's South Side and employed for a time in the stockyards, Pacyga gives voice to the city's steelyard workers and kill floor operators, and maps the neighborhoods distinguished not by Louis Sullivan masterworks, but by bungalows and corner taverns.

Filled with the city's one-of-a-kind characters and all of its defining moments, Chicago: A Biography is as big and boisterous as its namesake--and as ambitious as the men and women who built it.

Chicago: City on the Make

Chicago: City on the Make

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"Once you've become a part of this particular patch, you'll never love another. Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies. But never a lovely so real."

Ernest Hemingway once said of Nelson Algren's writing that "you should not read it if you cannot take a punch." The prose poem, Chicago: City on the Make, filled with language that swings and jabs and stuns, lives up to those words. In this sixtieth anniversary edition, Algren presents 120 years of Chicago history through the lens of its "nobodies nobody knows" the tramps, hustlers, aging bar fighters, freed death-row inmates, and anonymous working stiffs who prowl its streets.

Upon its original publication in 1951, Algren's Chicago: City on the Make was scorned by the Chicago Chamber of Commerce and local journalists for its gritty portrayal of the city and its people, one that boldly defied City Hall's business and tourism initiatives. Yet the book captures the essential dilemma of Chicago: the dynamic tension between the city's breathtaking beauty and its utter brutality, its boundless human energy and its stifling greed and violence.

The sixtieth anniversary edition features historic Chicago photos and annotations on everything from defunct slang to Chicagoans, famous and obscure, to what the Black Sox scandal was and why it mattered. More accessible than ever, this is, as Studs Terkel says, "the best book about Chicago."

CHRYSANTHEMUM CHAIN

CHRYSANTHEMUM CHAIN

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The second case for Superintendent Otani of the Hyogo Prefecture of Honshu, the main island of Japan, where the death of a respected foreign academic presents a problem not just for the police but also for Andrew Walker the young British Vice-Consul in the Prefecture's capital Kobe, who has to master the formal intricacies and rituals of Japanese mourning as well as police procedure. With his vast knowledge and experience of Japan, James Melville again weaves an intriguing murder mystery into a subtle and affectionate depiction of Japanese life, often as seen through Japanese eyes observing western visitors observing them! Published in Japan as The English Teacher Murder Case.