Staff Publications

Chicago by Day and Night

Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker's Guide to the Paris of America

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Showcasing the first Ferris wheel, dazzling and unprece­dented electrification, and exhibits from around the world, the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 was Chicago's chance to demonstrate that it had risen from the ashes of the Great Fire and was about to take its place as one of the world's great cities. Millions would flock to the fair, and many of them were looking for a good time before and after their visits to the Midway and the White City. But what was the bedazzled visitor to do in Chicago?

Chicago by Day and Night: The Pleasure Seeker's Guide to the Paris of America, a very unofficial guide to the world be­yond the fair, slaked the thirst of such curious folk. The plea­sures it details range from the respectable (theater, architec­ture, parks, churches and synagogues) to the illicit--drink, gambling, and sex. With a wink and a nod, the book decries vice while offering precise directions for the indulgence of any desire. In this newly annotated edition, Chicagoans Paul Durica and Bill Savage--who, if born earlier, might have written chapters in the original--provide colorful context and an informative introduction to a wildly entertaining journey through the Chicago of 120 years ago.

Finding Your Chicago Ancestors

Finding Your Chicago Ancestors

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No matter where you live, if you have Chicago ancestors, and want to know anything about them, this step-by-step guide written especially for beginners is for you and your search. Using a unique approach of helping you answer one type of question per chapter so you don't have to wade through a lot of preliminaries to launch or continue your genealogy work, DuMelle not only shares her finely-honed expertise on the basics, but slips in dozens of unusual and back-door tips for tracking down the toughest family details and mysteries.
The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism:The Menorah Association and American Diversity

The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism:The Menorah Association and American Diversity

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Daniel Greene traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to the lived experiences of a group of Jewish college students and public intellectuals, including the philosopher Horace M. Kallen. These young Jews faced particular challenges as they sought to integrate themselves into the American academy and literary world of the early 20th century. At Harvard University, they founded an influential student organization known as the Menorah Association in 1906 and later the Menorah Journal, which became a leading voice of Jewish public opinion in the 1920s. In response to the idea that the American melting pot would erase all cultural differences, the Menorah Association advocated a pluralist America that would accommodate a thriving Jewish culture while bringing Jewishness into mainstream American life.